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Astrix on a CISO Series Episode: Hacking Third-Party Integrations

Astrix Co-Founder & CEO, Alon Jackson, recently joined Dan Walsh, the CISO of VillageMD, and David Spark, host of CISO Series for an hour of critical thinking about securing app-to-app integrations. Astrix Co-Founder and

The Super Cyber Friday episode dedicated to third-party application integration security: “Hacking Third-Party Integrations” is now available to watch here.

Main topics covered:

  • How are applications being brought into the enterprise IT environment? What does the security department know about and don’t know about?
  • What is the non-user activity that’s happening among applications?
  • How do you keep tabs on this activity that appears to be just a push for more automation?
  • What’s the vulnerability of low code and no code apps that allow people to connect apps easily?
  • What can’t we see in these third party integrations that we should want to see?
  • How do you determine which app integrations are risky?

Tune in as Jackson and Dan discuss the risks of app-to-app connectivity, low-code/no-code iPaaS, and more:

Click here to watch the full episode here.

Here’s a sneak peek:

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The Ultimate Guide to Securing App-to-App Integrations

How to discover and remediate over-privileged, unnecessary, and malicious integrations to your most critical systems.

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Risk #3: Compliance violations
  • What it is: An act that compromises an organization’s ability to comply with relevant governmental, legal, or industry frameworks – for example, data privacy regulations (like GDPR) or security and governance (like SOC 2).
  • Recent example: Ticketmaster received a $1.6 million fine for GDPR violations after hackers exploited vulnerabilities in the code of a third-party chat app vendor on its checkout page, exposing customers’ personal and payment data.
  • Why third-party integrations increase the risk: Any third-party application involved in data processing is part of an enterprise’s regulatory purview – meaning that the organization is ultimately responsible (often financially and legally) for its handling of sensitive data.
Risk #2: Direct malicious access
  • What it is: Malicious actors seek direct access to core platforms by tricking users into providing consent (via OAuth permissions rather than explicit credential phishing) or by taking advantage of leaked API keys, certificates, webhooks urls, etc.
  • Recent example: Microsoft recently warned of a phishing attack in which Office 365 users received emails intended to trick them into granting OAuth permissions to a fake app.
  • Why third-party integrations increase the risk: With third-party applications increasingly integrated to core platforms, access tokens enable malicious actors access to data and operations on organization critical systems.
Risk #1: Supply chain attacks
  • What it is: A third-party app integrated to a trustworthy central platform may “leak” sensitive data into a less secure environment. Malicious actors abuse security vulnerabilities associated with a legitimate (but less secure) third-party application – and exploit its privileged access to sensitive information (like credentials or data).
  • Recent example: Hackers compromised the software development tool Codecov to gain access to – and rapidly copy and export to an attacker-controlled server – sensitive secrets,credentials and IP associated with software accounts at thousands of clients.
  • Why third-party integrations increase the risk: More and more third-party applications hold the “keys to the kingdom”: the most privileged credentials in the enterprise. Any third party application that can be compromised opens up the possibility of unauthorized intrusion (and data extraction, ransoming, and more) by malicious actors.